City-born Sri Srinivasan is US appeals court’s chief judge

Chandigarh-born Sri Srinivasan has become the first Asian American to serve as chief judge for the influential appeals court in Washington, United States (US).

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City-born Sri Srinivasan is US appeals court’s chief judge

City-born Sri Srinivasan is US appeals court’s chief judge

Chandigarh-born Sri Srinivasan has become the first Asian American to serve as chief judge for the influential appeals court in Washington, United States (US).

The 53-year-old was born in the city in 1967 when his father, late Thirunankovil Padmanabhan Srinivasan, was professor in Panjab University’s (PU) mathematics department. His parents eventually migrated to the US in the 1970s.

Recalling his association with the late professor, who was appointed lecturer in PU in 1955 , his colleague, retired Ram Prakash Bambah, says, “We were just two teachers here in the department when we appointed Srinivasan as a lecturer in 1955 or 1956.”

City-born Sri Srinivasan is US appeals court’s chief judge

Sri Srinivasan took the oath as chief judge on the Hindu Holy book Bhagavad Gita. (Reuters)

He was also a good friend of former prime minister of India Manmohan Singh, recalls Bambah, when Singh was a senior lecturer of economics at PU, and later went on to become reader and professor in economics.

“It was during his service years here in PU that professor Srinivasan got married and Sri Srinivasan was born. They lived at faculty house F6 on the campus.I guess Sri Srinivasan was two or three years old when his parents left for the US,” says Bambah, adding that the family later visited the city and PU.

Sri Srinivasan, who took the oath as chief judge on the Hindu Holy book Bhagavad Gita and became the first
federal appellate judge of South Asian descent, has two sisters.

Earlier in 2013, on the nomination of the then US President Barrack Obama, Sri Srinivasan became the judge of the US Courts of Appeal for the District of Columbia Circuit.

This made him the first Indian American to be on the bench of the country’s second most powerful court, the first being the US Supreme Court.

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